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Embassy of Argentina in Mexico City

Photos: Aquintero82, CC BY-SA 4.0

The Embassy of Argentina in Mexico City is on Av. Paseo de las Palmas in Lomas de Chapultepec. This is the main seat of the Argentine diplomatic mission to Mexico. The embassy moved, with great fanfare, from a tiny facility just across the street in 2006.

Argentina and Mexico share a long colonial history as subjects of Spain. Both declared their independence from Spain in 1810. Argentina won independence in 1816 and Mexico in 1821. Argentina sent its first consul to Mexico in 1880, and in 1891, Mexico returned the gesture.

In 1914 the United States and Mexico came close to declaring war on each other. Argentina, together with Brazil and Chile, successfully intervened in a meeting held at Niagara Falls to prevent the conflict from escalating.

It was only in 1927 when both countries elevated their diplomatic missions to full embassies. Over many decades of military dictatorship in Argentina, countless political exiles have sought asylum in Mexico. This was in the tradition that began with the Spanish Civil War under the Cárdenas government. It’s been an important part of Mexican culture ever since.

Today the two countries enjoy strong bilateral trade. Mexico’s exports to Argentina include automobiles and parts, electronics (cell phones), and chemicals. Argentina’s exports to Mexico include aluminum, leather, medicine, and raw minerals.

How to get here

Nearby

San José de las Palmas, Lomas

Nearest at 0.28 kms.

Embassy of Italy in Mexico City

Nearest at 0.76 kms.

Galería Nina Menocal

Nearest at 0.91 kms.

Bakéa

Nearest at 0.3 kms.

Recomendado por CANIRAC

Mattea

Nearest at 0.4 kms.

Recomendado por CANIRAC

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